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  1. The internet in the therapeutic space

    Below is an extract of a blog from Catherine Knibbs on internet use, social media and devices and the ethical questions that arise from counsellors in the therapeutic space.

    There are many approaches and guidelines around how to use equipment you find in the kitchen. Call them directions, user guides or instructions, aka destructions in my household as no one ever reads them. Therein lies the problem…#skimming or #ignoring or #doesntapplytome (I’m using hashtags # to highlight the fact that this can be trend/pattern.

    So if there was indeed a user guide for cyberspace would you ignore it? Skim over it? Throw it in the bin or digest every ounce of the contents? Did you know a document such as this actually exists for counsellors and psychotherapists and has done for a while?

    http://onlinetherapyinstitute.com/ethical-framework-for-the-use-of-social-media-by-mental-health-professionals/

    That’s the one. Have you read it? What do you think about it, what are your reflections and what rights do you think you have for using your social media accounts as you see fit? What do you think about your clients and their social media usage?

    Do you have rights? Do your clients? What might these be? What do you expect from the sites and applications (programs) that you use when it comes to privacy, harassment, location services and your right to express yourself as a human being on the Internet?

    Ethical dilemma after ethical dilemma right?

    What about the question that can often go unnoticed… What happens about your past or your opinions of today becoming your future? (or future past for that matter)

    What effect will this have on you or your clients?

    I have deliberately put questions forward in this article to get you thinking. Please feel free to feedback and let’s open this up for debate, I’m sure you will be surprised at both your response and others too. (I should also insert a comment about trolling and respect for each other, however the point is exactly that- – you never know the response that will occur after posting).

    Now onto working with clients who bring technology into the room, again what rights do you have a counsellor to insist that the device is turned off or not brought into your room? Why would this be ethical or unethical? Do you know about geolocation and tagging? (go and google these terms if you’re not sure)

    Would this have an effect on your practice? Do you have a right to have your device in the room?

    What about access to the Internet? What about the content a client may show you that is on their phone? (Think #sexting and #underageconsent). Do you know enough about the internet to know what  apps are safe, underage, ethical, secret or indeed coercive?

    Read the rest of Catherine’s blog on her website www.cybertrauma.com

    Catherine will be discussing these questions and more at the Cybertrauma training on Wednesday 8th March.

    Posted 23 February 2017
  2. New training: Cybertrauma 8th March 2017

    Wednesday 8th March 2017

    9.30am-4.30pm

    Cybertrauma: A new paradigm for working with cyberspace issues in therapy and beyond.

    What do you do if a child has Tinder on their smartphone?

    What if a client asks to record you in session?

    This training will look at the online world for children and young people, as well as adults, whether that be gaming consoles, PCs, tablets or smartphones. The training will looks at the issues, and pitfalls that people face online, how this affects the person and their ability to engage in interpersonal relationships, how to practically work with these issues.

    What will be covered?

    • What does cybertrauma mean?
    • What happens when a person is traumatised online?
    • Attatchment theory, use of devices, and the distinction from addiction
    • Introduction to attachment and how this relates to devices and cyberspace
    • Introduction to Polyvagal communication (how and why we communicate online the way we do)
    • Ethics, the law and your practice.

    Parts of the training include discussion based learning/breakout sessions.

    E-safety leaflets will be provided and a handy guide to take home with you.

    There will no doubt be more questions by the end of the session as cyberspace is ever evolving and the material is constantly updated to reflect this.

    About the trainer: Catherine Knibbs is a child sex abuse therapist and founder/CEO of Peer Support Yorkshire CIC, a service for child trauma, abuse and attachment. Catherine conducts research into the affects of cyberspace on young people’s interpersonal connections. Before training as a therapist, Catherine worked in gaming and computers.

    Location: Priory Rooms, Quaker Meeting House, 40 Bull St, Birmingham B4 6AF

    Cost: £90 (voluntary orgs / individuals) £105 (Statutory / private orgs) + booking fee

    About the trainer: Catherine Knibbs is a child sex abuse therapist and founder/CEO of Peer Support Yorkshire CIC, a service for child trauma, abuse and attachment. Catherine conducts research into the affects of cyberspace on young people’s interpersonal connections. Before training as a therapist, Catherine worked in gaming and computers.

    Bookings: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cybertrauma-a-new-paradigm-for-working-with-cyberspace-issues-in-therapy-and-beyond-tickets-30076837631

     

     

     

     

    Posted 7 December 2016

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